Link

Bookmarks: Wardrobe

Capsule wardrobes are all the rage these days. For good reason, actually. I discovered this summer that I pretty much have a functional capsule wardrobe. I go through the same outfits every other week and used to feel self-conscious about it. “Will people think I don’t do laundry?” Obviously I need to not worry about what people may think, but it was encouraging to know that there’s a move towards simpler wardrobes that aren’t about wearing a new combination every single day.

My wardrobe may be functionally capsule, but it’s not truly effective. There are some pieces that need to be replaced because they’re getting worn out or are not very comfortable.

In pursuit of a good capsule wardrobe, I had bookmarked 5 (maybe more) pages on forming a simple wardrobe.

  1. A sample mix and match wardrobe. Not very useful as this none of these are clothes I own. Delete.
  2. Tips for a minimalist wardrobe. Fairly straight-forward. It gives me some action steps:
    1. Identify my colors. Actually, looking through my bookmarks, it appears I’ve already completed this quiz: Bright colors and silver or gold. Done.
    2. Purge accessories.
    3. Identify accessories that I know would match my wardrobe and style but are affordable (so that I can pass them along if they don’t work out).
    4. Find and purchase said accessories.
    5. Purge through closet. Box up and store items that I don’t wear but like, donate items I won’t wear in the future. Salvage any clothing that I like but need repairs.
  3. A listing of how many items of clothing a person needs. Delete.
  4. Another listing of what pieces of clothing one needs plus shopping tips. Delete.
  5. Building a Remixable Wardrobe. This is a great series of post that I highly recommend. However, it’s a lot like a new cooking recipe. It’s too many tips/techniques for me to take in now while I’m still just getting my feet wet (oh, the mixed metaphors) with a capsule wardrobe. I prefer simple, so I’m going to skip this one. Great resource, but not for me.

Bonus: Facebook lets you bookmark links now too. I had an article saved on reasons why a capsule wardrobe is a good idea. Highly recommended, but intuitive once you’ve started putting it into practice. Delete.

I’d like to take a moment to recommend another great resource: Missus Smarty Pants. I had a subscription a few years ago, but never really used it. However, it’s a great service to use if you find that you’re struggling with your wardrobe. I feel like I’m in a good place of knowing what I like and what I look good in (I’m just struggling in acting on that knowledge…).

So, there we have it. Five bookmarks discarded and clear action steps on what I can do next to make those resources useful. I’ll post a follow-up once they are completed.

Next!

Bookmarks: Intro

Last night I finished reading Deniece Schofield’s Confessions of an Organized Homemaker (at the recommendation of Auntie Leila). Many of the ideas are similar to what I’ve learned from the FlyLady, but it was still a very valuable read because it made me rethink how organizing works. I probably knew this before, but it was made even more clear to me that organization is not about arrangement, it’s about function. Lining objects up in a pretty row is of no use if it prevents you from being able to use them in a natural, logical way. Beautifully arranged objects are not necessarily any easier to use.

Putting physical clutter aside (figuratively) for just a moment, I’ve been collecting loads of informational (i.e. digital) clutter for years now. I see an article online or start researching a topic and find a bit information that I think, “Oh, I need to keep that for later.” So I bookmark it or download it and it piles up. Now, this clutter doesn’t really get in the way of anything. I have plenty of space on my computer, I don’t even think there’s a max of bookmarks that you can save in Google Chrome. However, the more time I’ve spent in this habit, I’ve realized the futility and waste of it. I find myself re-researching the same information over again and never really benefitting from it.

This is my idea: purging, organizing and using this informational clutter. If there’s anything of value in an article that I want to remember, I can quote or summarize it here. If there’s a method or lifestyle I want to adopt, I can analyze it here and discard the multiple articles that say practically the exact same thing. If there was a joke or comic I was saving for a laugh, I can share it here for others to enjoy.

Part of this project will be a chronicle of my interests, part of it will be a testament to my lack of self-discipline. But mostly it will be a way for me to really think about and put to use these bookmarks I’ve saved. I remember and understand things that I write about better than things I just read about. By writing about them here, maybe I can commit more of this information to my memory than to my computer’s. Then maybe I’ll find it useful, and if I don’t, I can let it go.

So here’s to an experiment!